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Prosecutors in La Crosse, Wisconsin Prove That Video Surveillance Doesn't Lie

Published by Ellen on October 24, 2012 7:42 AM

At VideoSurveillance.com, we're all about keeping our customers safe and protected. We've also underlined the fact that megapixel-quality and/or high-definition surveillance cameras provide clear and detailed images that make recognition and identification possible. Prosecutors in La Crosse, Wisconsin agree. The local La Crosse Police Department also concurs; video surveillance footage has been instrumental in solving crimes, including those that have taken place in the last year. Tim Gruenke, District Attorney, spoke to LaCrosseTribune.com, saying that video has become one of the best tools for prosecutors in the courtroom. He went on to state the following, which was highlighted in

"People make such a big deal about DNA, but really, cell phones and videos can be a lot more solid," he averred. "It can point to someone's guilt or innocence. You really can't change that. It is what it is."

Furthermore, video surveillance tends to be far more valuable and reliable than listening to an eyewitness who may lie or alter facts. Sometimes the most important details in solving a crime such as DNA, timelines, and motives can be much more difficult to either obtain or confirm. However, high-end security camera footage provides an actual glimpse into a crime, giving the jury proof of what occurred, especially if the footage was high-resolution.

Companies in La Crosse have provided evidentiary video to law enforcement that have helped solve two homicide convictions and another one in particular that resulted in a guilty plea. For example, the murder of Kristen Rodgers swayed the jury in reaching a guilty verdict because of the video evidence that was shown in the courtroom. Despite the investigators finding the suspect's DNA on the victim's body, the security camera video may have had more of an impact on the jury's verdict. The video showed a clear image of the suspect's van in the exact location where Rodgers' body was found. The visual evidence proved that the suspect was at the scene of the crime, which eventually led to a guilty verdict.

This is just one example of how video surveillance doesn't lie. And remember, low-resolution security cameras aren't as pivotal in the courtroom as high-resolution cameras video are, because poorly designed, grainy surveillance cameras greatly diminish the quality of the video footage. Without sharp images, police departments and prosecutors won't be able to use it, or it may not be enough to solve a crime. Good job La Crosse!

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